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DIMENSIONS

 

Size and shape are critical parameters in MRF sorting, and this must be considered in designing packages for recycling. The MRF process separates items by size and shape first, then by material. Screens direct paper, and similar two-dimensional lightweight items, into one stream; containers and similar three-dimensional heavier items into another steam; while broken glass and smaller but heavy items are allowed to drop by gravity to yet another stream, which may or may not be further sorted. Large, bulky items are typically manually sorted on the front of the MRF process.

Items more two-dimensional than three-dimensional render the package non-recyclable per APR definition.
Aside from not being captured in the plastic stream, they cause contamination in the paper stream. Items should have a minimum depth of two inches in order to create a three-dimensional shape for proper sorting. This issue is unrelated to the polymer type. The APR encourages and anticipates developments in MRF design and technology to improve capture and recovery of thin plastics; however, at the current time this technology either does not exist or is uninstalled in the majority of MRFs.

Items smaller than 2 inches in 2 dimensions require testing to determine the appropriate APR recyclability category. The industry standard screen size loses materials less than two inches to a non-plastics stream, causing contamination in that stream, or directly to waste.  These small packages are lost to the plastic recycling stream. It is possible that some small containers travel with larger ones when either the screens wrap with film or they are operated above their design capacity.  Film wrapping reduces the effective size of the screen and over-running provides a cushion of large items on which the smaller items travel.  The design guidelines use clean screens operating at their design capacity for the determination of the recyclability category. The APR anticipates and encourages technology development to improve the process of small package recovery but currently these items are not recovered.

Benchmark TestEvaluation of Size Sorting Potential for Articles with at least 2 Dimensions Less than 2 Inches
 

Polyethylene or Polypropylene are preferred for items greater than two gallons in volume.
Recycling machinery, particularly automatic sorting equipment, is not large enough to accept items larger than two gallons. Because larger containers jam the systems, most MRFs employ manual sortation before the automatic line to remove the large items. These items are recovered in a stream of bulky rigid containers that are sold and processed as polyethylene since the vast majority of bulky rigid items are comprised of this polymer. Other polymers either negatively effect or are lost by the polyethylene processing.

  • Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    The PET section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of PET packaging. Read More
  • High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

    High Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

    The HDPE section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of HDPE packaging. Read More
  • Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

    Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

    The PVC section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of PVC packaging. Read More
  • PE Film

    PE Film

    The Film section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of Film packaging. Read More
  • Polypropylene (PP)

    Polypropylene (PP)

    The PP section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of PP packaging. Read More
  • Expanded Polystyrene (EPS)

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS)

    The EPS section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of EPS packaging. Read More
  • Polystyrene (PS)

    Polystyrene (PS)

    The PS section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of PS packaging. Read More
  • Polylactic Acid (PLA)

    Polylactic Acid (PLA)

    The PLA section of the APR Design® Guide provides a detailed overview of design features to address when considering the recyclability of PLA packaging. Read More
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