The Association of Plastic Recyclers

APR Applauds Progress at INC-4 Negotiations on Plastic Pollution

The Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) issued the following statement at the conclusion of the fourth session of the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee (INC-4) on plastic pollution:

"APR commends the substantial progress made in Ottawa to reduce plastic pollution through a global instrument. The message remains clear that these UN negotiations are truly a sea change moment in how we make, consume, and dispose of plastic products, and that recycling is an essential solution towards a circular economy. APR's Steve Alexander, Kate Bailey, and Megan Byers attended the negotiations and several major side events, as APR remains committed to supporting the US negotiation team in the work toward INC-5. Several APR members were also deeply involved at the events in highlighting the importance of design standards, Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) policies to fund recycling, and the need for stronger market demand. While the global negotiations are no doubt critical, the events were also a strong reminder of the key role APR and its members have to improve the US recycling systems, and the significant global benefits of leading on the ground as US businesses and stakeholders."

APR interview with Plastics Recycling Update on INC-4:

Kate Bailey told Plastics Recycling Update she feels optimistic that treaty text will come out of the process, but also that "there is significant momentum within a lot of key stakeholders to move forward on the issue regardless of some of the exact language and limitations of the treaty itself."

"To me, the entire process still continues to symbolize this sea change moment, that we are shifting gears on how we make, use, consume and dispose of plastics," she said.

There are also key differences between INC-2 and INC-4, Bailey noted. For example, now EPR is thrown around "like a household word," she said, compared to a year ago when it was barely part of the vocabulary. In addition, there seemed to be a greater willingness among North American and United States stakeholders, including businesses, to work together, she said.

"At the end of the day, we're going to walk away from a global political process and come back to the real work on the ground," she said.

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